Amytal Drug Facts | A Center for Addiction Recovery

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Information provided below is courtesy of the National Institute On Drug Abuse (NIDA)

Amytal Overview

Amytal Addiction TreatmentAmytal Sodium is the brand name medication for Amobarbital sodium. These barbiturates are nonselective central nervous system (CNS) depressants that are primarily used as sedative hypnotics. In subhypnotic doses, they are also used as anticonvulsants. Barbiturates are a type of depressant drug that cause relaxation and sleepiness. A barbituate overdose occurs when someone accidentally or intentionally takes more than the normal or recommended amount of this medication. At relatively low doses, barituates may cause you to seem like you are drunk, or intoxicated. Amobarbital sodium is a white, friable, granular powder that is odorless, has a bitter taste, and is hygroscopic. Amobarbital sodium is a substituted pyrimidine derivative in which the basic structure is barbituric acid, a substance that has no CNS activity.

Amytal Signs of Abuse

A person abusing Amytal will look sedated or drowsy. They will talk slowly and may slur their speech. They will not be able to concentrate and their coordination and memory are likely to be off. They may also feel dizzy. They are likely to have poor concentration. Along with slow breathing and heart rate, their blood pressure will be lower. As sedatives also lower inhibitions, they may exhibit poor control of their actions and may take risks they would not normally take.

Effects of Amytal Abuse

Sedation/drowsiness, reduced anxiety, feelings of well-being, lowered inhibitions, slurred speech, poor concentration, confusion, dizziness, impaired coordination and memory.

Amytal Withdrawal Symptoms

The symptoms of barbiturate withdrawal can be severe and may cause death. Minor withdrawal symptoms may appear 8 to 12 hours after the last dose of a barbiturate. These symptoms usually appear in the following order: anxiety, muscle twitching, tremor of hands and fingers, progressive weakness, dizziness, distortion in visual perception, nausea, vomiting, insomnia, and orthostatic hypotension. Major withdrawal symptoms (convulsions and delirium) may occur within 16 hours and last up to 5 days after abrupt cessation of barbiturates. The intensity of withdrawal symptoms gradually declines over a period of approximately 15 days. Individuals susceptible to barbiturate abuse and dependence include alcoholics and opiate abusers, as well as other sedative-hypnotic and amphetamine abusers.

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